TOP 10 BANNED DOG BREEDS

TOP 10 BANNED DOG BREEDS

SOCIALS

Have a look at everything we have going on across all our socials 

 

CHECK OUT OUR COURSES FOR MORE ADVISE FOR ALL YOUR TRAINING NEEDS

Perfect Puppy Course. Your step by step guide to raising a perfect canine companion and becoming a calm and consistent leader, to get it right first time round. 

Canine Boot Camp. Your one month program to becoming a high level canine leader, restructuring your relationship with your dog and addressing problem behaviours.

Number 10 – The American Pitbull Terrier Given the reputation of the Pitbull as “most dangerous dog on the planet”, finding it on today’s list is hardly a surprise. After all, American Pitbull Terriers are said to have caused the highest number of fatalities in the US, closely followed by the Rottweiler. However, these beautiful, athletic dogs can make quite sweet and affectionate family companions. Pitbulls are banned in many cities of the US, as well as in 12 countries around the world, such as the UK, France and Finland.  Number 9 – The Rottweiler Our number 9 spot goes to the second most “dangerous” dog breed according to the before-mentioned statistic – the Rottweiler. Besides being an absolutely amazing police- and multi-purpose utility dog, the Rottie has become quite popular worldwide for its outstanding guarding abilities. Having one of these muscular dogs in your home almost guarantees that no one will enter it without permission. Rottweilers are banned in Ecuador and their ownership is restricted in Portugal, Ireland and other countries. Number 8 – The Tosa Inu And on the number 8 spot of our list of the TOP 10 banned dog breeds, we have the Japanese Mastiff, also known as the Tosa Inu. The imposing Tosa is combination of various Japanese and Western breeds, for example the Great Dane and the English Mastiff. Unfortunately, Tosas are used in dog fighting in Japan, where this blood sport is still legal. Of course, this practise does nothing to prevent serious dog aggression in this breed. Japanese Mastiffs are illegal to own in countries such as Norway, the UK, Denmark and Malta. Number 7 – The Dogo Argentino  And at number 7 on our list of the TOP 10 banned dog breeds, we have an absolutely beautiful, exclusively white-coloured dog – the Dogo Argentino. Even though it is classed as a Mastiff, this elegant Argentinian athletes looks more like a tall Pitbull rather than a classical Mastiff. Like Tosas, Dogos are very prone to dog aggression and come with an extremely high prey drive. This stunning Argentinian breed has been banned in the UK and in some major cities of the US. Other countries (like Turkey, Denmark and Norway) have restricted the ownership of Dogos. Number 6 – The Boerboel The South African Mastiff, also known as the Boerboel – which means “farmer’s dog” in Afrikaans -, has been banned in Denmark in 2010. These giants can easily weigh around 150 pounds and are more than capable of taking down intruders – humans and animals alike. And to this day, Boerboels are defending African farms against the large and dangerous predators native to the country.  However, they are not overtly aggressive to humans or dogs, so banning them at all does not seem to make a lot of sense. Number 5 – The Neapolitan Mastiff On our number 5 spot, we have the undisputed “King of Droop and Drool” – the awesome Neapolitan Mastiff. Apart from the Shar Pei, there is no breed who can rival this dog’s loose skin, especially around its face and neck. This feature had originally been bred into the Italian Mastiff’s ancestor, the ancient Molossus Hound, to protect them during battle with wild animals. But today’s Neapolitan Mastiff is mostly a very gentle giant. Nevertheless, the breed is banned in Singapore. Number 4 – The Bandog Here on the number 4 position, we have a breed that is in essence a mixed-breed rather than a purebred dog. And it is banned wherever the Pitbull is prohibited: The Bandog – a cross between the American Pit Bull Terrier and various Mastiff breeds. The goal of these breeding efforts in the late 1960s was to create a Mastiff-sized dog with the prey drive of the Pitbull. Bandogs excel in sleeve-work and in various protection roles, but can be quite hard to control and are certainly not a good choice for the inexperienced owner. Number 3 – The Fila Brasileiro And here we are, at the TOP 3 positions on our list of the TOP 10 banned dog breeds on Earth! The winner of the Bronze Medal is a dog whose loyalty is legendary in its native country: The Brazilian Mastiff, more commonly known as the Fila Brasileiro. This giant protector is a perfect property guardian who will not allow unbidden “visits”, and will fight to the death to protect its owners. Filas come with a considerable level of natural aggression towards strangers and need a calm and consistent leader to be safe dogs. They are banned in the UK, Portugal, Norway, Malta and Cyprus. Number 2 – The Akita And right here on the Silver Medal spot, we have another breed famous for its loyalty and world-renowned for its excellent guarding abilities - the beautiful Akita. These keen protectors can make superb pets and family guardians, but their protective nature also can lead to bite incidents, unless, of course, the dog is properly socialised and trained by an experienced owner. Even though Akitas are neither a bully breed nor a Mastiff, they still are banned in several cities across the US, on the Bermudas as well as in Singapore. Spain and Ireland have restricted ownership of Akitas. Number 1 – The Wolfdog Now, we have reached the pinnacle of excellence in the world of banned dog breeds.  And my personal TOP candidate for the Gold Medal is the immensely fascinating Wolfdog. In fact, there are various different kinds of wolf hybrids that people have created over several generations. For example, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, who is a cross between German Shepherds and Carpathian wolves, or the Saarloos Wolfhound (a cross of German Shepherds and Timber wolves). Their unique genetic structure makes Wolfdogs quite unpredictable: In some situations, they react like a wolf and in others like a domesticated dog. What is common to all Wolfdog breeds is their extremely high prey drive. Which probably was the reason behind the attacks on small children that have occurred over the years. Wolfdogs are prohibited in many states of the US as well in Norway. 


Sign up for our Newsletter!

Don't miss out on our new content. Sign Up!