GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER TEMPERAMENT

GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER TEMPERAMENT

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Most Common Behavior Problems: The most common behavioral issue with the GSP is separation anxiety. This breed bonds tightly with their families and hate to be away from them for long periods. This can be rough of the GSP and cause them to bark excessively. Or start to chew on things they shouldn't as a way to relieve their nerves.  Another common behavioral issue that can arise with this breed is jumping on people. This can be especially problematic if there are young children or older members of the family present. The GSP has boundless energy, and due to their incredible attachment to their people, they can get worked up a little too quickly when someone finally comes home or are trying to introduce themselves to someone new. Possible Downsides and Known Temperament issues: Not every breed is perfect for every person, and when selecting a breed, it is always best to know what you are getting into beforehand. Here are a few things about the GSP's temperament that could be seen as a downside.  This breed is slow to mature and tend to keep that puppy-like essence about them into adulthood. So, if you are looking for a dog that might become more mature and settle down a bit after a few years, this breed is probably not an ideal one.  If you are looking for a breed that doesn't want to be your shadow, the GSP might not be a good choice. This breed is wholly devoted to their people, and they want to be around them as much as possible.  The GSP is active, and not just in a physical way, but mentally. They need large amounts of mental stimulation and are always eager to do something. Anything. So, they might not make a right choice for someone who wants something more mellow and would be willing to just laze around with them.  The GSP also has a massive prey-drive. While they can be good with small animals if excellent care is taken, some individuals will never be trustworthy around the family cat, for example. This can also go for small dogs. This breed's urge to give chase is a deeply rooted one.  Unfortunately, there is also temperament issues to consider. When selecting a GSP is important to go to a reputable rescue or a breeder that prioritizes temperament. According to the American Temperament Testing Association, the GSP breed population scored a 78%. This means that the other 22% of the tested population was found to have an unstable temperament.  With correct temperament and a high-level canine leader:  With some of the unpleasant things now out of the way- let's get to the good parts of the GSP's personality.  They actually make good guard dogs. While the breed is a friendly one and they might not comfort a thread as most guarding breeds would. They will definitely alert to let you know if something out of the ordinary is around.  This breed is friendly and typically has a sunny disposition. The GSP tends to like other people once they get done announcing their presence. They can quickly settle in with new people and solicit attention from them.  The breed does well with other dogs their size, which can make them a good choice if someone wants to bring them into a house where there are other dogs. However, they might not do so great with a very independent breed that doesn't have as much energy as they do.  They also do well with children. GSPs are sensible and are predictable. Plus, they are fun- which can make them a great choice for a home with children. They will gladly play fetch with a younger member of the family until their heart's content. 

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