How To Groom Your GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

How To Groom Your GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

SOCIALS

Have a look at everything we have going on across all our socials 

 

CHECK OUT OUR COURSES FOR MORE ADVISE FOR ALL YOUR TRAINING NEEDS

Perfect Puppy Course. Your step by step guide to raising a perfect canine companion and becoming a calm and consistent leader, to get it right first time round. 

Canine Boot Camp. Your one month program to becoming a high level canine leader, restructuring your relationship with your dog and addressing problem behaviours.

Brushing The GSP is an easy keeper as far as brushing goes. They don't have much of an undercoat, but this also means that instead of blowing their coat with the changing of the seasons, you can expect a little more shedding year-round.  GSP's will need to brushing weekly. This will help reduce the amount of hair you find around the home and also keep the dog's skin in good condition as brushing isn't always about merely reducing hair and help to move healthy oils that buildup near the skin and the base of the fur up and through the rest of the coat. It also creates a bonding experience for you and your dog.  The brushes you need for a GSP can be one of the following:  A pair of grooming gloves. A firm bristle brush.  A rubber curry comb.  The brushing process is simple and just gently run the brush over the dog's coat both with and against the direction of the hair. Don't worry about making the GSP uncomfortable, and going against the hair doesn't hurt as long as it is brushed back in place. This also helps to lift the hairs and get out any loose strands that might be trapped there.  Bathing For bathing matters, the GSP might need baths more frequently due to how active they are. This breed likes to explore the outdoors and follow their noses, which can get them into some dirty situations. All-natural, high-quality dog shampoo is all you need unless your dog has some skin allergies, which can be common in the breed. If this is the case, use a high-quality hypoallergenic shampoo. It is vital never to use human shampoo on a dog of any breed as human shampoo is not chemically balanced for dog hair and can damage their fur and skin. You might need a rubber or plastic curry comb to help work the shampoo into their coat, and it will make the process of removing any dirt hiding under the fur.  Once the GSP is all clean, it is crucial to dry them off well with a hand dryer and also to brush them out again. Leaving water trapped under the coat can cause hot-spots and skin irritation.  Eye Care It would be best if you made inspecting your GSP's eye a part of your regular grooming routine. This breed does have several eye conditions known throughout the breed. Such as Cone Degeneration, which can lead to day blindness. If it seems like your GSP is having a hard time seeing during the day, it is time for a vet visit. Other than that, eye care is relatively minimal, and you just need to be mindful of any discharge you see and make sure to wipe it up.  Ear Care The GSP is a breed with floppy ears, so an ear cleaning should be part of your normal grooming and bathing routine with this breed. You will need some cotton balls and a canine ear cleaning solution. Dampen the cotton ball with the solution and then wipe the inside of their ear with the cotton ball's damp part. Never push the cotton ball into the ear and only clean what you can see. Pushing down into the past, what is visible can easily damage the dog's sensitive inner ear. This is also why you never want to use a Q-tip to do ear cleaning. If the skin in the ear looks flushed, if you see discharge, smell anything, or see large amounts of dry, flaky buildup in the dog's ear, it is time for a vet visit as any of these can be a sign of infection.  Also, if your dog gets wet, either after bathing or swimming, make sure to dry their ears with a cotton ball. Leaving ears damp can cause bacteria to buildup and lead to infection.  Nail Care GSPs who are active will need less nail care as they will wear down their nails naturally. But usually, they will need a clip every six to eight weeks. It can vary from individual to individual and can depend on diet. A good rule to follow is that if you hear the dog's nails clip against the floor when they stand up, it is time for a nail trim. Or if a clicking noise can be heard as they walk across any hard surface. 

Sign up for our Newsletter!

Don't miss out on our new content. Sign Up!