5 Reasons you SHOULD NOT GET A Great Dane Puppy

5 Reasons you SHOULD NOT GET A Great Dane Puppy

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5. The first thing we need to consider when we are possibly thinking about bringing Great Dane into our home is that they can be expensive. Do you have a big enough car? Most Great Danes will struggle to fit comfortably and safely in a regular-sized car. It is something to really consider if you like to take your dog with you when you go out. Or even just for annual trips to the vet.

How about the amount of food it will cost? This breed will require high-quality food with good proteins and healthy fats to foster slow and steady growth. Prompting growth too quickly in this breed will lead to joint problems and other issues that can lead to much more costly problems down the road. Starting at two months of age, a larger Great Dane Puppy can eat up to four cups of food per day, and that amount of food increases each month. A full-grown Great Dane can easily pack away six to ten cups of food per day. If you feed kibble, you can be looking at $70 to $100 a month to feed one of these giants.

If you want to go on vacation, can't bring your Dane with you, and don't have anyone to dog sit, you can expect to pay more to board your Great Dane at a kennel as well.

4. The next reason why you probably shouldn't get a Great Dane has to do with health. This is a massive dog, and the breed does have some pretty prevalent health issues. This can mean some enormous vet bills. This breed is very susceptible to bloat, which is when the stomach turns over on itself. Bloat is life-threatening, and it requires emergency surgery. This procedure can cost you anywhere in the ballpark of $1,500 to upwards of $7,500. While you can get a specialized surgery to get the dog's stomach tacked to prevent bloat- this is a medical procedure where the dog's stomach is pinned to the inside of its abdomen wall. And can cost anywhere from $500 to $800.

Great Danes also have other health problems, such as hip and elbow dysplasia. These conditions affect the dog's hip joints, where it connects to the pelvis and the elbow joints. And causes the dog to have trouble with mobility. Hip or Elbow Dysplasia can be due to genetics, diet, or not exercising appropriate caution while the dog is young and still growing. Surgery for hip dysplasia is also expensive and can be between $3,500 and $7,000 to correct, and that is just for one side- if the dog is compromised on both sides, this price easily doubles.

Because the Great Dane is a larger breed, it will just cost more for most medical procedures. As they require more anesthesia to fully sedate them. Medication costs are also more due to their size and the fact that they will need a large dosage than a dog breed of average size.

And lastly, sad to this breed's large size and the health issues within the breed, it does have a much shorter life span. Danes, on average live to about eight to twelve years. But it is not uncommon for dogs as young as five years to pass away.

3. Our next reason for why you shouldn't get a Great Dane is if they do not have a confident and consistent leader, behavioral problems can arise. The Great Dane is a large, incredibly powerful breed, and while they are known for being gentle, this does not mean that they are a soft breed. If they do not have an effective and confident leader, they can quickly get out of hand, and for a dog that can reach up to two-hundred pounds (or 90 kilograms), one would be hard-pressed to try to restrain this breed by physical means alone. Even something like playful nipping or jumping up on people can be a real problem with a dog of this size, and it can easily lead to injury even if the dog does not intend it. This is why having excellent communication and being an excellent canine leader is especially important with a Great Dane.

2. When Great Danes are younger, they will need a solid thirty to sixty minutes of exercise to keep them happy and to take the edge off so they don't get pent up and get into something they shouldn't. As they get older, they tend to slow down a bit and have less need for a workout to cool them off.

While a Great Dane would be happy to accompany its owner, it might have a harder time doing incredibly long hikes or an activity that requires an equal amount of energy. It is actually possible to overdo it with this breed of dog. As they have such long legs and can be prone to injury if they exert themselves too much. If you're a fan of all day long hikes over challenging terrain and want your dog to accompany you- the Great Dane is going to have a rough time keeping pace with you, and you might be better off with a more active breed.

1. Our last reason you shouldn't get a Great Dane is that they share similar issues with other large breeds. Great Danes do drool and slobber, especially after eating or drinking. They also tend to drool when they get excited. It is not uncommon for Dane drool to end up on clothing or on walls and furniture.

The Great Dane is a massive dog with a very large presence. It should come as no surprise that their voice suits them. Danes often alert when they hear something exciting outside or if a dog or person passes their home. Which can be a bit much given that they are very loud when they bark.

A Dane can also easily knock over a full-grown person. So, one needs to take care when bringing one of these dogs into a home with young children or elderly family members. They are sometimes not aware of their own size, and just knocking into someone on accident could be enough to send them toppling over.