How Do I Introduce My STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER To My Family

How Do I Introduce My STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER To My Family

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Brining a puppy home is an overwhelming day for them as they find themselves in new surroundings and today we will teach you how to introduce your puppy to your family. 

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STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER VS ROTTWEILER

STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER VS ROTTWEILER

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The actual origin of the Rottweiler is a little bit murky but is incredibly interesting. Many people state that the breed was around when the Romans brought their dogs with them during their invasion of Europe. These dogs were said to have then been crossed with native breeds like the Entelbucher and the Great Swiss Mountain Dog. Rotties were most often found in Southern Germany and in Switzerland and were given their name because of the fact that so many of them were left in the town of Rottweil in Germany’s southern region of the Black Forest. Their main role in this area was to herd and guard livestock. They were seen as extremely loyal and courageous dogs, and this gradually spread across to other parts of the country. They became popular with butchers who would use the impressively strong dogs to pull carts and they actually became known as the Butcher’s Dog. By the 19th Century, Germany had outlawed cattle driving which meant that the Rottie population declined and it was not until 1914 when they began to be valued for their work as war dogs. In 1882, the first Rottie was shown in Germany and Rottweiler clubs were established in 1907. By 1910, the Rottweiler due to its incredible strength, determination, guarding nature and high prey drive became Germany’s official police dog. They were brought to the UK in 1936 and were bred by a handful of enthusiasts of the breed. Rottweilers today are very popular for their guarding abilities, but also for their loyal and kind natures which has increased their popularity as family pets in many countries across the world.  The Staffordshire Bull Terrier shares a common ancestor with that of the Pit Bull Terrier and Bull Terrier – the Bulldog. It was created in the 19th century to be a smaller and quicker fighting dog, but one who was gentle and kind towards people. It was most likely bred by crossing the Bulldog with an ancestor of the Manchester Terrier which eventually developed into the Staffy we know and love today. The very first Staffordshire Bull Terrier Club was formed in England in 1835. Now the size of the two breeds is very different. Staffies tend to stand between 14 and 16 inches at the shoulder with males being taller compared to females. Male Staffies will weigh between 28 and 38 pounds whilst females weigh from 24 to 34 pounds. Staffies have a short and smooth coat which lies close to their skin and can be a variety of colours including red, fawn, white, black, blue, brindle or any of those colours with white. Male Rottweilers tend to be between 24 and 27 inches at the shoulder weighing between 95 and 130 pounds, whilst female Rotties tend to stand between 22 and 25 inches and weigh around 85 to 115 pounds. Rotties are large, well-proportioned and very muscular dogs. They have broad heads with slight wrinkling on their heads and when they are alert their skin tightens. They are quite different to the Boerboel when it comes to coat colour as the Rottweiler is a black and tan coloured dog.  The Staffordshire Bull Terrier, like the vast majority of dogs, can be more prone to particular health conditions. These include hip and elbow dysplasia, bone conditions, cataracts, enzyme defects, skin allergies or mange. Staffies have an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years which is more than the Rottie. The average lifespan of a Rottweiler is between 8 and 10 years when they are properly cared for and fed an appropriate amount. It's essential that breeders only use "temperament-tested" dogs in their breeding programmes which helps ensure their offspring inherit their kind natures. It's worth noting that, like other breeds, the Rottweiler is known to suffer from a few hereditary health issues with the conditions that seem to affect them the most being cancer, eye problems, Ectropion, bone and muscular problems, bloat, hip and elbow dysplasia and skin issues. Staffies over the years have been misunderstood and given a reputation which does not represent them accurately. They are an energetic dog with a people-loving personality and is known to long to take care of its family. Being a very attentive and alert dog, you can be sure that they’ll let you know of any visitors you may have. Early socialisation is really important with Staffies in order for them to grow into a well-rounded dog who is less wary of dogs that it has not yet met. They are strong-willed and need plenty of exercise and mental stimulation and it is best to begin their training early as puppies. This is similar to that of the Rottie. Rotties are one of the most intelligent dog breeds and learn new things very quickly. This does mean that they can pick up bad habits easily and need a firm and consistent hand in training. Rottweilers need to be well socialised from puppyhood and it cannot be stressed strongly enough that their training must start as early as possible too. Failing to socialise a puppy or train a young dog correctly is not fair on either the Rottie or their owners. They are extremely intelligent, but they also have a very dominant side to their characters meaning they need to be corrected by a calm and consistent leader in a household in order for them to be well-rounded dogs.

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DO STAFFORSHIRE BULL TERRIER HAVE HIGH PREY DRIVE

DO STAFFORSHIRE BULL TERRIER HAVE HIGH PREY DRIVE

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Whilst dogs have been bred away from being predators like their wolf ancestors, most of them still retain the instinctive ability and want to hunt – due to breeding, the prey drive manifests in many different ways in different dog breeds. Prey drive includes a few different behaviours including searching, stalking, chasing, biting to grab or biting to kill. Obviously not all dogs have such a strong prey drive, but it’s good to be aware of the specific behaviours as all dogs are individuals and temperaments can vary.  The Staffy is known to have an extremely strong prey drive. They are a powerful breed and you should take great care when allowing them to run off lead in areas where they could come across smaller animals or dogs that they do not already know since they can be very wary of other dogs. Due to the breeds’ strong prey drive, as an owner, you need to be aware that it can be a mistake to trust a Staffy around any small animals and pets – including cats and small dog breeds.  The Staffy is known to be kind and tolerant to children of all ages, but it is important to be aware that they can sometimes play a bit rough and so are not always the best choice for a family with babies or very young kids.  These impressive dogs need to be well stimulated both physically and mentally in order for them to be well-balanced dogs and to prevent them from developing destructive or unwanted behaviours. They are a high energy breed and boredom needs to be prevented – the more exercise your Staffy is given, the more relaxed they will be in the home.  Even when a Staffy is well-trained, the extremely strong prey drive in them is complete instinct and so can become a real issue if you decide to take your dog to areas that are not secure where there will be smaller animals guaranteed to be around. It’s hard to trust that your dog won’t take off if they spot anything in the distance, they believe to be worth chasing even if at a long distance. Staffordshire Bull Terriers are playful dogs and greatly enjoy the company of people. Although so many assume that the Staffy is an aggressive dog due to its history of being a fighting dog, they are very affectionate and sweet-natured dogs that love to spend time with their owners. As I previously mentioned, Staffies can be boisterous by nature and with good breeding, handling and training they can grow into a very well-balanced dog. You should be aware of the difference between a dog playing and a dog pushing the boundaries to see how far they can go.  As I mentioned already, the Staffy is a very intelligent breed and, with an experienced owner and consistent training, they can be quite easy to train. They are headstrong dogs that need to be handled well as they may test the limits as to how far they can go. They must be socialised from a very young age with other dogs, people and situations. Even with an owner who is very familiar with the breed, you should never assume that your Staffy can be trusted 100% because of their prey drive being so strong.  It’s important to understand the difference between prey drive and aggression as they can very easily look like they are one in the same. A dog’s aggression is driven by very strong emotions like fear whereas their prey drive is instinctive. Aggressive dogs will want to increase the distance between themselves and the object of their aggression, but a dog’s prey drive will draw them closer to the target. So why does this really matter? Well – as a dog’s prey drive is not driven by emotions, it is most often easier to manage than emotion-based aggression.  An extremely strong prey drive can be particularly problematic if you dog wants to chase absolutely anything that it sees – going for walks could become a nightmare for you as an owner. So, they need to be properly trained and corrected in order to prevent your dog from ignoring your every call. Most of a dog’s prey drive behaviours are harmless, but can cause problems for you as an owner, being unable to go for a walk with your canine companion and to be constantly worrying that they are going to take off.  It’s super important to look into the specifics of a dog breed before bringing them into your home to make sure that you and your pup will be a good match. Plus, it’s good to be aware of the different behaviours that your breed of interest may show more than another breed would.

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STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER vs BULL TERRIER

STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER vs BULL TERRIER

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The Staffordshire Bull Terrier and the Bull Terrier are both incredibly popular breeds. They have a number of similarities and differences but which would be better for you? Today we compare the 2 breeds.

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Where Should My STAFFORSHIRE BULL TERRIER PUPPY Sleep?

Where Should My STAFFORSHIRE BULL TERRIER PUPPY Sleep?

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Deciding the place you puppy sleeps at night might be something you have not thought about but it can be incredibly helpful especially for their training and routine.

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How Much Does A STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER Cost?

How Much Does A STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER Cost?

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When buying a Staffordshire Bull Terrier puppy you should think about more than just the initial cost. Owning a dog can be very expensive so you should always think about the ongoing costs. Today I break down the overall cost of a Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

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NEVER LET YOUR STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER EAT THIS!!!!

NEVER LET YOUR STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER EAT THIS!!!!

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Watching what your dog eats is very important as there are many poisonous things to dogs and today you can learn what to foods to keep your dog away from. 

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ARE STAFFORSHIRE BULL TERRIER GOOD FOR FIRST TIME OWNERS

ARE STAFFORSHIRE BULL TERRIER GOOD FOR FIRST TIME OWNERS

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There are many things to consider before bringing a puppy into your home, especially if this is your first ever experience of having your own dog.  Staffordshire Bull Terriers have not always had the best reputation as a breed due to originally being bred to fight other dogs, but what people do not always realise is that the Staffy is actually not a dangerous breed at all. They are bold and courageous dogs, but they are reliable, loving and loyal dogs that long for companionship with their owners. As with all dog breeds, you are required to provide them with lots of socialisation from a young age with strangers and other animals for them to grow into a good-natured and well-rounded adult dog. Although they need quite a bit of care and attention, they are an incredibly good choice for a first-time dog owner that is after a dog that is loyal and affectionate. When these dogs are well-bred, well-trained and well-socialised from a young age they are a real pleasure to have around due to their good-natured and people-orientated personalities. Staffies love your attention and long to show you just how much you mean to them through their loving and devoted nature. They are known to be very kind and tolerant towards children of all ages as long as they have plenty of socialisation to get used to how they are expected to behave. As with all dogs and young children, you should not leave them unattended. They can be slightly boisterous at times when playing so this is very important to be aware of if you are someone who has very young children. The Staffy is an intelligent breed and when they are well-bred and in the right hands, they can be quite easy to train. This is provided that their owners can match their intelligence and be firm as a Staffy can test the limits as to how far they can go. It is common for this breed to have a slightly stubborn element in them which means you need lots of patience to consistently train your pup – you should train your Staffy with a firm, but gentle had as, although they are a strong-willed breed, they are also pretty sensitive in nature. Their love for their human companions makes them extremely eager to please you; they benefit greatly from knowing who their leader is and their ‘place’ in the ‘pack’. They can easily develop unwanted bad habits and destructive behaviours if they are not trained properly and consistently from puppyhood. Again, socialising your dog from puppyhood will help when training as they will be much more manageable and once you have their attention, they will listen and learn.  Although the Staffy’s loving personality is a very positive quality, it does have a challenging element which may need your daily routine to adapt depending on your lifestyle. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is an incredibly people-orientated dog breed and does not tolerate being left on their own and can even suffer from separation anxiety. Their sensitivity and strong devotion to their beloved human companions can cause this, so if you are looking for a dog that can be left alone then the Staffy is not going to be the breed for you. You can train your dog to be left alone for very short periods of time as long as you start this training from a young age. A Staffy’s high intelligence means that they need to have lots of mental stimulation to prevent any destructive behaviours from developing. They are a high-energy active breed that need a minimum of one hour of energetic exercise each day. The more exercise that you are able to give your Staffy, the more relaxed they will be in the home having released their energy on a long walk. They are impressively athletic dogs with a muscular build and have actually been known to easily jump tall fences without much effort at all. Being intelligent dogs, they also need a lot of mental stimulation to prevent boredom which, as an owner, you will need to be able to provide. If you are looking for a dog that can fit into your already active lifestyle then the Staffy may be a great choice for you as long as you can train and socialise them as they need.  It’s super important to do lots of research before making your final decision when getting your puppy, so we highly recommend watching more videos and reading up about the breed. Overall, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is well suited to first-time dog owners that are willing to give the dog the care and focused training that it requires. They are incredibly loving and can make for a great family companion with a high amount of socialisation. If you are looking for an active companion that also loves to just spend time with you, then the Staffy may be a great first choice for you.

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When Should My STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER Be HOUSE TRAINED
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